pascalcampion:

Happy place.#pascalcampionart.-Hi Mister Snuffles…. I’m ok… I’m not sad.Sometimes people cry because they are too happy to say it otherwise.I’m happy, fully.

pascalcampion:

Happy place.
#pascalcampionart.
-Hi Mister Snuffles…. I’m ok… I’m not sad.
Sometimes people cry because they are too happy to say it otherwise.
I’m happy, fully.

according to their lengths on my kindle, terrible romance novel is now

longer than: vanity fair, wives and daughters, the way we live now, middlemarch, anna karenina

still significantly shorter than: les miserables, gone with the wind, war and peace

i found this dream I wrote down, it was lurking in a text document from like a week ago or more. i am posting it so i can close the doc.

Read More

food beard

food beard

fashionsfromhistory:

Susan Walker Morse (The Muse)
Samuel F. B. Morse
c.1836-1837

The full-length portrait of Susan Walker Morse (1819–1885), the eldest daughter of the artist, was painted during the crucial years of the invention of Morse’s telegraph (ca. 1835–37). The painting shows the girl at about the age of seventeen, sitting with a sketchbook in her lap and pencil in hand with her eyes raised in contemplation. Although traditionally described as a Muse, the figure is more likely a personification of the art of drawing or design. Morse drew on the full extent of his European training, taking from the works of Rubens and Veronese in what was to be an ambitious farewell to his career as an artist. Stymied by a lack of financial success, he abandoned painting for science and inventing. This painting was first exhibited at the National Academy of Design in 1837, where it won enthusiastic praise. Susan married Edward Lind in 1839 and moved to his sugar plantation in Puerto Rico, returning often to New York to spend extended periods with her father, who had been left a widower when Susan was just six. She gradually grew less and less happy with her husband and plantation life. Lind died in 1882; in 1885, Susan set out to return to New York permanently but tragically was lost at sea. (MET)

MET

fashionsfromhistory:

Susan Walker Morse (The Muse)

Samuel F. B. Morse

c.1836-1837

The full-length portrait of Susan Walker Morse (1819–1885), the eldest daughter of the artist, was painted during the crucial years of the invention of Morse’s telegraph (ca. 1835–37). The painting shows the girl at about the age of seventeen, sitting with a sketchbook in her lap and pencil in hand with her eyes raised in contemplation. Although traditionally described as a Muse, the figure is more likely a personification of the art of drawing or design. Morse drew on the full extent of his European training, taking from the works of Rubens and Veronese in what was to be an ambitious farewell to his career as an artist. Stymied by a lack of financial success, he abandoned painting for science and inventing. This painting was first exhibited at the National Academy of Design in 1837, where it won enthusiastic praise. Susan married Edward Lind in 1839 and moved to his sugar plantation in Puerto Rico, returning often to New York to spend extended periods with her father, who had been left a widower when Susan was just six. She gradually grew less and less happy with her husband and plantation life. Lind died in 1882; in 1885, Susan set out to return to New York permanently but tragically was lost at sea. (MET)

MET

azertip:

red-lipstick:

Kumiko 日本插画师久美子 (Japanese) - Untitled     Paintings

bedlamsbard:

The difference between learning a modern language and an ancient language is that in first year French you learn “Where is the bathroom?” and “How do I get to the train station?” and in first year Attic Greek or Latin you learn “I have judged you worthy of death” and “The tyrant had everyone in the city killed.”

milkmanner:

UTENA IS STILL SO GOOD

milkmanner:

UTENA IS STILL SO GOOD

sollertias:

Portrait of a Young Lady by Amos Cassioli, 1880 (detail)

sollertias:

Portrait of a Young Lady by Amos Cassioli, 1880 (detail)